Mar 27, 2016

Big Green Egg: Concrete Top Table Plans

DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady

Anyone who cares enough to have a Big Green Egg, deserves an amazing Egg table.

When we couldn't find the perfect table, we set out to build our own.  Before getting started, we found pictures of many great tables that fellow BGE fans have built.  None were exactly what we wanted, so we created our own plans.  I thought we'd share in hopes that we can inspire or help you to create your own.


I hadn't originally planned to document the process, so I didn't take excellent pictures.  Hopefully the few that I do have will help.


Okay, here we go, ready?


PICTURES FOR REFERENCE -


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady

MATERIALS & TOOLS:
*You can find almost all of this at your local big box hardware store.  I included links for clarity.

Frame/Base -
  • Treated Lumber
    • Six 31 ½” 4 x 4s
    • Four 31” 2 x 6s
    • Three 22 ¼” 2 x 6s
    • Six 31” 2 x 4s
    • Six 22 ¼” 2 x 4s
    • Extra lumber to reinforce (2 x 4s) and build shelf tops (1 x 6s)
  • Kreg Blue-Kote 2 ½” Pocket Hole Screws
  • Kreg Pocket Hole Jig
  • Wood Stain or Paint of your choice and brushes/cloths to apply
  • Materials to close in one side of the table as a cabinet or make a drawer

Concrete Tabletop -
  • One 4’ x 8’ x 3/4” Sheet of Melamine
  • 2” Wood Screws
  • Painters Tape
  • Latex Caulk (black or other dark color)
  • Styrofoam Circle 22” diameter 1 ½” thick (we ordered ours here)
  • Plastic cloth (to cover tabletop while it dries and to cover surfaces while sanding)
  • Quikrete Profinish Concrete (we used 3 80lb bags)
  • Rebar or Chicken Wire
  • Water Based Concrete Sealer
  • Concrete Countertop Polish

Other (optional) -
  • 3 Large Pot Feet (for BGE to sit on)
  • Materials to build a cabinet, or more shelves
  • Acid Stain (to add color to the tabletop)
  • Bottle Opener
  • Towel Rack
  • Grill Tool Hooks
  • Table Cover (we ordered a custom one from duckcovers.com, great customer service!)

DRAWINGS:
Main Parts -
DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady

Table with Measurements -
DIY Big Green Egg Table with Concrete Top and Barn Door | The Lowcountry Lady


STEPS:
Frame/Base -
  1. Plan out your table.  Depending on where you’re going to place your table, the size of your BGE (ours is large) and your own preferences, you might want to alter the size or materials.  I've included a basic drawing below - feel free to print and write in your own measurements.  The most important measurements to get right are the size of the table opening (where the egg will go) and the distance between that hole and the surface your egg will sit on.
  2. Obtain materials (list above).
  3. To start the base/frame for your table, cut your lumber down to size.  I’ve included an image below that shows the required boards.  You’ll want to go back and add braces on the corners as well as other supporting boards - there is some flexibility in how you do this so I haven’t provided measurements or specific number of boards.  That said, you can see where I added support in one of the pictures.
  4. For the best finish (no visible screws), use a Kreg Pocket Hole Jig where all of the boards meet.  You can get one of these for about $40 at most hardware stores.  Use the Kreg 2 1/2" outdoor screws (the blue ones) to connect the boards.
  5. Starting with the legs and the 2 x 6 boards that connect the top of frame, assemble your frame.
  6. If you’re using treated lumber, allow the wood to cure for at least 3 weeks before you stain or paint.  This way the stain will absorb well or your paint won’t bubble due to moisture from the wood.
  7. After the wood is dry, stain or paint the frame (you could move on and start working on the top while you wait for the frame to dry).

Concrete Tabletop -
  1. To make the tabletop, start by assembling a melamine mold.
  2. Cut melamine to size.  To determine the size, add ½” to the length and width of the desired size of the tabletop.  In our case we ripped a width of 33” (because our top is 32”).  After the main piece, rip 1 ½” strips that will form the sides (adjust if you want a thicker or thinner table top).  Tip - if you're going to build a slab for the egg to sit on, incorporate that into your mold so you can pour all at once.  Also, be sure to put a strip of painter's tape down before making your cuts so the melamine doesn’t chip or splinter.
  3. Use wood screws every 8" - 10" to assemble the mold (pre drill so the melamine doesn’t expand).
  4. Place your styrofoam circle (measure twice, placement is very important!  We placed the center 20” from the left edge and then centered it width-wise.) and screw it in place.
  5. Caulk all of the edges and around the styrofoam with latex caulk.  It's a good idea to use black instead of white so to help make sure you can easily spot and missed spots.  This is to prevent water from seeping out the form.
  6. Cover all exposed edges of the mold with painters tape (this is very important because if concrete gets in, the moisture will cause the melamine to expand).
  7. Mix the concrete according to the package instructions.  Not too watery.
  8. Pour about 1/2" of concrete in your mold.
  9. Place the rebar or chicken wire on top of the layer of concrete.  Be careful not to push it down, you don’t want it to show on the surface of the tabletop.  This is why it is important that your concrete mix isn't too watery.
  10. Continue pouring concrete to the top of your mold.
  11. Using a board that is wider than your mold, smooth out the surface of the concrete by shimmying the board back and forth from one end of the table to the other.  Don’t worry about making it perfect, this will be the bottom of the tabletop.
  12. Remove any major air bubbles by running a vibrating sander all around the exterior of the mold (you could also tap the sides with a hammer).
  13. Cover the concrete with plastic and let it cure for 2 - 3 days.
  14. Un-mold your tabletop by flipping it over (you'll likely need help for this part) onto a steady surface.  It is possible that with a couple shakes, the tabletop will slide right out.  If not, or if you prefer, you can unscrew the melamine and remove it.
  15. Get your tabletop and egg slab ready for finishing by making sure it is on a steady surface and in a place that can get very messy.  We did this on the driveway, away from vehicles, etc.  If you’re placing the top on your egg table bass, instead of on sawhorses, cover the table base with plastic.  Water and wet concrete are going to fling around a radius of several feet.
  16. Setup the orbital wet grinder according to the product directions.  You can buy one on amazon or you can rent one here (we rented, so much less expensive!). Get diamond sanding pads.
  17. Starting with a 50 grit sanding pad, sand the entire tabletop and outside edges.  You will likely start to see holes from small air bubbles that were trapped in the concrete.  Don't panic, we will take care of that in a couple steps.  Sand the whole surface thoroughly.
  18. Repeat with the 100 grit, then 200 grit.  Put the sander away for the day.
  19. Get a small bag of Portland Concrete to the consistency of play-doh.
  20. Fill in all of the holes exposed by sanding with the concrete.  Smooth it out so there aren’t any big globs, but don’t worry about making it perfect, because you’ll go back over with the sander.  Make sure you fill in all the holes.  The best tool for this is your hands.  Let it sit for 24-48 hours.
  21. Set your wet sander up again.  Starting again with the 200 grit, sand the entire table.  All of the holes will be filled in and smooth.
  22. Sand with 400 grit, then 800, 1500 & 3000.  The longer you do this with the 1500 & 3000 grits, the more polished the surface will become (a neighbor stopped to ask if the top was marble, it will look that polished!).  When you're happy with the surface, let it dry for a about a day.  For the egg slab, we stopped with 400 grit.
  23. Apply a sealer to the tabletop and egg slab according to product directions.  I recommend using a small high quality roller.  Let it dry.
  24. Apply a polish to the tabletop according to directions.  The best way to apply this is with lint free fabric.  We used these microfiber cloths from Amazon.  We didn’t polish the egg slab, but you could.
  25. Now that your egg slab is ready, you can complete the rest of your table frame.

Final Assembly -
  1. Complete the shelf around the slab with boards of your choice.  You could do a whole big concrete shelf instead of using boards on each side, just keep in mind that would add a lot of weight.  Tip - you place your tabletop on the frame and get it centered, then place your slab directly centered under the table opening to determine exactly where it should sit before adding shelf boards.
  2. Finish the other side of the table however you like.  We did a shelf just at the bottom, and closed it in with corrugated tin and a barn door.
  3. Stain or paint your frame if you haven’t already done so.
  4. Put the frame of the table where you're going to leave it.  Level it out.
  5. Place the egg slab.
  6. Place the concrete tabletop.  Tip - One way to carry the top is to place it onto two long 2 x 4s, get someone to help and carry the top kind of like you're carrying a gurney.
  7. Place pot feet on the slab for the egg to sit on (good for circulation). You could place the egg directly on the concrete slab, be sure to raise the shelf that the concrete sits on if you go this route.
  8. You’re ready to place your egg in your brand new table!  Take the top off of the egg and take out the firebox to make inserting your egg more manageable.

Inside of the Cabinet (added Aug 20th, 2017) - see my post here.

Download printable plans.  You're welcome :)


75 comments:

  1. Just built my table using these plans. Reversed which side the egg went on and had a granite top fabricated rather than the concrete DIY. Looks awesome. Thank you much for posting this. Only thing I would mention is your cut list is a bit off on the support pieces but that was an easy fix. Thank you!

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    Replies
    1. I'm so happy to hear the plans were helpful! I'll try to review the plans and update the cut list... let me know if you have any specific feedback about where I was off. If you've posted a picture of your table online anywhere, please share a link. Enjoy your new table!

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    2. would you be interested in building one for me?

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    3. Hi there! We aren't in a position to be able to build any new tables right now. If you haven't figured out a solution by the fall, check back in with us and we may be able to help you out.

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  2. That is one of the nicest looking Egg tables I've ever seen. Well Done! Do you have a link to the barn doors hardware you used? I've seen some on amazon, but they don't appear to have the lower bracket included.

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    Replies
    1. Wow, thank you! We made the barn door hardware with materials from the local big box hardware store. The track is a piece of 1/4" flatiron. The wheels were pulley wheels. We painted all of the metal flat black. We did consider several barn door kits that we found online and I'm sure those would have been easier, just didn't find any we loved at that time. If you go through with your project, stop back by to let me know what you decide on for your hardware.

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    2. I am looking to buy a kit if at all possible, what would you suggest. I am not up on this typr of construction and found that there are many chooses.

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    3. Hello Joscelin, I am in the process of building this plan and had the same question. I ended up finding one on walmart.com.

      https://www.walmart.com/ip/6FT-Dark-Coffee-Country-Antique-Barn-Wood-Sliding-Door-Hardware-Track-Closet-Set/157135116?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=1617&adid=22222222227046567324&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=96382402850&wl4=aud-261800281660:pla-218723957810&wl5=9012545&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=113148158&wl11=online&wl12=157135116&wl13=&veh=sem

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    4. Hi Joscelin! A friend of ours used our plans to build their table, but like you, preferred to buy a kit for their barn door. They chose this one and it turned out awesome - http://amzn.to/2rmQwl6

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  3. Thank you. I plan on framing it up this weekend. I will send pics (if it turns out half as good as yours)

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    Replies
    1. I hate to bug you, buy before I cut wood I would like to verify the size of your big Green egg. I have the XL. From the pictures, yours looks like the large. If so, I could increases the width slightly.

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    2. Oh, not bugging me at all. Our egg is a large, so you're definitely going to need to adjust. You'll need to adjust the diameter of the hole for the egg, of course. Also, you may want to measure from the lip of the egg to the bottom of the egg to determine if the shelf that your egg will sit on needs to be higher or lower. Here is a good resource for the diameter http://biggreenegghead.com/big-green-egg/product-information
      I hope that helps, Paul.

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  4. What stain did you use for the frame?

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    Replies
    1. Hey Benjamin! I'm sorry to say we can't remember. It was exterior wood stain, and it was either Olympic brand (they sell it at Lowes) or Sherwin Williams. We've used both for various projects and had good luck. We choose a walnut color and did two or three coats.

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    2. I had asked Kim about this last year. She told me it was an Olympic stain. I am positive about that. I believe the color had mushroom in the name but I am not positive about that.

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  5. Thanks Kim,
    One more question, what were the measurements for the duck cover and what was the cost?

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    Replies
    1. It cost about $150. I don't have the measurements for the cover anymore, but they are very helpful and will make sure your cover is just the right size for your table if you give them a call.

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  6. What diamond grit did you use on the main table? You mentioned going up to 3000 but the Amazon link to the pads (the ones I bought), only go up to 800.

    Also, the two pictures of the table dimensions don't match (length).

    Any why the two different types/brands of concrete?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Eric - we used 400 grit, then 800, 1500 & 3000. I checked the links in the supplies list and the directions and both point me to a set of 7 ranging from 50 grit to 3000.

      As far as the discrepancy in length on the pictures... typo, I'm afraid. I will correct in the images as soon as I can.

      As far as the two types of concrete, the Quickcrete is much more cost effective to use when initially pouring your table. The Portland Concrete is much better for filling in any tiny holes caused by air bubbles, but if you don't have any holes or want a more rustic tabletop, you could skip that step.

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    2. Hey Kim! Sorry for the delayed response. I got busy and I assumed I'd get an email that you'd replied! ha. Anyhow, thanks for the information. Mine turned out kinda bad and rough looking. But the good news is the "rough" concrete top is cool in a flintstones unfinished way so I'm going to attempt to just put a Marine UV clear coat on top and see how it turns out. I think I didn't use enough water in the concrete and I didn't tap it to get the air bubbles out.

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  7. Thank you so much for this. I have literally never built anything before and my table came out great. I just did a wood top with 1x6 slats and shortened the width a little bit. I also decided to use fire bricks under the egg and put casters on it for easy maneuverability.
    Hopefully this photo link works.
    https://coxautoinc.box.com/s/t4r45zuumiq6wlyeygw6imqc4cxwfrv9

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    Replies
    1. Steve - your table looks awesome! The firebricks were a great idea as were the casters. We did consider the casters with ours, but the concrete top adds quite a bit of weight so we thought it might not be convenient to try and move the table often, even if it were on wheels.

      I'm glad the plans helped. Thank you for sharing the picture of your new table!

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  8. Can you tell me how long you took on sanding your table top? Also, did you use any anchors to attach the top to the base or is gravity doing all the work?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Zappia! We spent 15-20 minutes on each grit, but more important than the amount of time is making sure that you go over each part of the surface and are happy with the result before moving on to the next grit.

      Also, there is nothing anchoring the tabletop to the table. The concrete is quite heavy so gravity is all you need.

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  9. Can you post pics /instructions how you did the metal sides - inside & out? Love the table!! Thank you for posting!

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    1. Hi Julie, I'm afraid I don't have any additional pictures. We cut the corregated metal so that it would be just large enough to overlap the boards surrounding it, and placed it inside the table. We then attached it with several screws along the perimeter. Does that make sense?

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    2. Love your table! What tool did you use to cut the corregated metal?

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    3. We used tin snips, like these http://amzn.to/2njTBzr

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  10. Thank you for posting the pictures of your table construction. I already have a table that I am pleased with but have issues with the top and plan to replace it with a concrete top along the idea of yours except that it will be finished with a wood grain plank style tile attached to the concrete core. My question is about the melamine you used for the mold. Are you sure it was 1/2" or perhaps was it 3/4" thick? From the pics it looks more like the 3/4". I'm sure either would work but am curious about which you actually used. Many thanks in advance for your reply.

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    Replies
    1. Hey Randy! After a bit of conferring on our end, we think you're right and that we did use 3/4". Agree that it shouldn't matter, as you're not going to be moving the table top around much while it's in the mold, but if you want to follow the steps we did more closely, go with 3/4". I'm going to update the instructions above. Thanks for posting the question!

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  11. I like the color of your table. Is that stain or paint and do you remember the color?

    Also, I am planning on using your model to build a table for my Primo XL. I will take pictures and capture measurements along the way and would be willing to share the results.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Gator! It was exterior wood stain. Either Olympic brand (they sell it at Lowes) or Sherwin Williams. We've used both for various projects and had good luck. We choose a walnut color and did two or three coats.

      I'd love to see pictures when you finish your table. Good luck building!

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  12. Love your table! Going to start on one this weekend using your plans.
    What type of styrofoam did you order from the site you linked in your plans? Do you remember roughly how much it cost? I went to the site but their were several different types and want to make sure I get the correct one. Thanks. JD

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    Replies
    1. Hey Angela! How exciting that you're going to build a table. We called the foam company that I linked to above, explained what we were using the foam for and they made a suggestion. It was a firm foam, but I don't have a link directly to the product since we called. It was about $24. Good luck! I hope you'll come back and share pictures of you're table when you're done.

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  13. Looking to make the barn dorr can you help with the supplies that I will need?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If we had to do it all over again, we would likely buy this kit http://amzn.to/2rmQwl6
      Our friend used this, only had to cut the metal rail, and it turned out great!

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  14. Love your table. I'm working on mine as we speak. Question. Did you put the shelf I before the metal? If the metal first how did you attach the shelf? Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Hey there! We put the metal in first, attached the the metal with screws, then put the shelf in.

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    2. What is the best way to send you a pic of my table ?

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    3. Do you use any photo services like Google Photos, Photobucket, or Shutterfly? Other people have placed their photos in online albums and added the links here. Looking forward to seeing it!

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    4. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/iunl2l2cktnopsl/AAAv_RnEpPIP2MX19aglJpQaa?dl=0

      My table

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    5. Your table looks amazing! Thanks for sharing the pictures. What's for dinner?

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  15. Awesome table. Im building mine at this time. Question. Did you attach the metal before the shelf ? And how did you attach it? Thanks.

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  16. I'm in the process of building this table for my XL egg. I did extend it some and also made a small L. I've got it all framed and your drawings have been great. I just have a question on how did you build the cabinet door? I bought the Kreg jig so I'm assuming I can use that. Any help would be great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Josh! Use the Kreg Jig and wood glue. Join the 1x6's (or 1x4's) in 3 separate places. We recommend that you still attach 2 boards perpendicular to the 1x6's to tie it all together. Stop back by and share a picture when you finish up!

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  17. Can you please send me a couple pictures of the inside storage section? I'm stuck on how the metal sides sit as well as how the shelf lays against or underneath the sides. My email is brock9281@gmail.com. Thanks!!!

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    Replies
    1. Sure - I'm away for a couple weeks but will post or send as soon as possible.

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  18. Just finished mine this morning. The top, shelves and door are made of 5" white oak flooring. Thanks for the plans.
    http://rs946.pbsrc.com/albums/ad304/godwiar/IMG_2783_zpsp7awqt6g.jpg?w=480&h=480&fit=clip

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    Replies
    1. It looks fantastic, Austin! Thanks for sharing a picture. Enjoy your table!

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  19. Hi Kim, can you tell me how many bags and what size bag you used for concrete? Also, if Profinish is not available, any other suggestions?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Robbie - we used 3 80lb bags of the Quikrete. I don't have any experience with other brands, but if you can't find it locally, I think Lowes offers free shipping if you join their loyalty program.

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    2. One other question (sorry) is what rebar did you use and how did you place? Also was the mold/concrete easy to flip over?

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    3. We used chicken wire because it was easier to handle, but a friend of ours who used our plans used rebar. I would recommend looking for something less than 1/2 inch in diameter. Pour a layer of concrete, about half of what you're going to pour, then place your chicken wire or rebar. Because we used chicken wire, it ran throughout the table top. If you're going to use rebar, place several pieces across the surface and be sure to place some around where the hole for the egg. The mold was not difficult to flip, but it was heavy - it took three strong people to flip ours.

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  20. What type of sealer and wax did you use on your countertop? And how long after you polished it did you wait to apply the sealer and wax? And also how did you apply the sealer and wax? Sorry so many questions this is the last step I have left and I want to get it right. I will post pics when I'm finished. Thank you for the help

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We used this sealer -
      https://www.concretecountertopsolutions.com/product/z-siacryl-14-sealer
      and this polish -
      https://www.concretecountertopsolutions.com/product/z-counter-shine-polish
      We waited about 24hrs after using the wet sander on the concrete surface before applying the sealer. We applied it using a 1/4" roller. We waited another 24hrs before the polish and also applied it using a roller. Check out the videos included below the products in these links. They are pretty good tutorials that walk through how to apply the products in detail.

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  21. Hi there, what is the thickness of the boards you used for the barn door and shelves? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi,
    How did you cut the melamine? Did you use a table saw?
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hello,
    Wanted to say Thank you! for the table idea and plans. They really helped me out a ton. Always to try a concrete counter. This was perfect.
    We had some Carolina red cedar cut at the saw mill two years ago from my father's property. I decided to put it to use. I changed up a few things. Layout is reverse for my deck and patio. Had to build Barn door hangers as the others were to big. I used diamond plate for cabinet sides. Everything is really close to yours.
    I have only had my egg for two months. Love it and my table! thanks to you guys. Cheers from Charlotte.

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    Replies
    1. Awesome! I'm so glad the plans were helpful. I'd like to see a picture of the diamond plate you used for the sides, if you have one posted anywhere.

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  24. I love your table and am in the process of building my own! Quick question - do you have to use a wet sander or could a dry one work? The rental link you posted is no longer up and I can’t find a good wet orbital sander rental.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jay! You do need to use a wet sander/polisher for concrete. Thanks for letting me know the link doesn't work anymore. Give this one a try (I'll update the instructions, too) http://www.rentaltoolsonline.com/pw5001c-4-wet-grinder-stone-polisher-p-101132.htm

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  25. Hi Kim, love the table. We’ve been using your table as inspiration for our outdoor dining table and grill table. How did you get your grey concrete so light? It looks almost white. We’d love to make out tops lighter too if there’s a way! Thanks, Brian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Brian! A dining table, how cool! We didn't do anything special to lighten the color of our concrete. Using the diamond sander though, made the concrete so smooth and shiny. I think what you're seeing in the pictures is light reflecting off of the table as a result, which may make it look lighter in color. Did y'all do that step?

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  26. Beautiful table! Out of curiosity, how much time did it take for you to make this table and what was the total cost for materials? Doesn't have to be exact - just a rough estimate. Trying to decide if we want to make our own or purchase a table.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Nicole! We spent 3 to 4 full days building it (spread out over a few weekends). A friend of mine used these plans and knocked it out over a long weekend. I believe we spent around $500 all in.

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  27. Thanks so much for posting plans and pictures! I just made my table and am about to start the sanding process. Did you literally just buy a bag of the Portland Concrete and just add water to make the play doh consistency? I didn't know if you added any sand or gravel to the Portland Cement mixture? Thanks for your help!!

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    Replies
    1. Just add water :). Good luck, share pics when you're done if you can!

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    2. I appreciate your quick response! I will give it a try! Also why the Portland Cement? Could you just do the same thing with the quikrete that I used for pouring the table? (I am not an expert with this stuff at all). LOL. Thanks again for your help!

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    3. I think you could do about the same with quikrete, though we didn't try. The Portland cement plus water creates a smooth dough like material that is really easy to work into the holes. Since it is smooth to begin with it is easier to polish down too.

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  28. Hi Kim,
    I really like the design. I'm in the process of building the frame and need to shorten it's length by 9 inches. Have you had any heat issues around the egg section? I'm thinking of shortening that section from 31" to 25"

    Thanks,
    Chris

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    Replies
    1. Hi Chris, we haven't had any heat issues around the egg. You could probably get away with making that section 25" instead of 31".

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  29. Kim, My wife wanted to buy me a table for my XL BGE, but the cost is ridiculous and they look cheaply made. Your design is the best I've found on the internet(Thanks for sharing). Quick question. You built your table for a Large(18" diam) BGE with a hole of 22". I have a XL BGE(24" diam), so I'm thinking I need to increase those boards and the concrete tops width by (at least) 6". Would you agree?

    Regards,

    Michael

    ReplyDelete

I would love to hear your thoughts and ideas. Please leave a comment!